click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130115
20130123
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
? it's hard enough getting jobs right now in this economy. veterans' unemployment is a little bit higher than the national rate. then you have people who are dealing with some type of wound as they try to get back into the workforce. do we have to curry the jobs towards their skills? >> no, i don't think so. i think these disabled veterans bring lots of skills and leadership skills as well as the breadth and depth of experience they had in the services back to local communities. what has occurred is the u.s. army in 2007 asked the national organization on disabilities to help develop a solution to this problem, and they created three locations in north carolina, texas and colorado to work very closely with these stabled veterans. it was one on one with other veterans working with veterans, primarily disabled with disabled, very career-intensive veterans centric and focused on transitioning them back into civil society. the success rate has been over 70% of those veterans after 18 months have a job or they're in some sort of educational environment to include vocational training. i
industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>steve: welcome back. the welfare state is growing and sadly on so many levels no sign of it slowing down. >>gretchen: that according to a new chart released by republicans on two senate budget committees. according to dana colmes, federal welfare spending expected to skyrocket 80 % over the next decade. stew varney is here. how did he come up with that calculation? >> that is government numbers used by republican members of the senate budget committee. it represents a whole new america. in fact, it represents a total reversal from the days of welfare reform in the mid-1990's. welfare has made an enormous come-back. there are no plans to rein it in. it is going to go up by $11 trillion. spending on welfare up $11 trillion
. but obviously he's going to be talking about jobs and the economy. i think in order to do that, he's got to be making us more competitive throughout the world with other countries because you look what's going on in india and china and others and brazil, as an example, and they're eating our lunch. we'll be discussing obviously immigration, which, again, whether it's republican or democrat, they have to get on the band wagon because something has to be done with respect to immigration. and it can be done in a positive way. reducing the debt is a very big thing. i know he'll be talking about guns and some people like that and some people don't. but he'll probably be mentioning that. terrorism is a big thing. you look at it just in watching your show previous to my going on, i'm looking at all that's going on in the world with terrorism and we're not making too much of a dent because it is a mess. they were talking about and our president was talking about how wonderful mali is. mali has been overrun. it's really a big problem, terrorism. so obviously that's going to be high on the agenda
is fantastic on its face. a boss pays people to lose weight. >> if you can't get a raise in a tough economy, maybe your boss will pay you to lose weight. this company offers programs where the incentive to lower body mass index or cholesterol numbers is cash. more employers are looking for programs that will get workers fit. it is the result, of course, and you can probably imagine, of the rising health care costs associated with insurance and reduced productivity, workers dealing with obesity and other chronic health issues reportedly cost more than $153 billion a year in lost productivity because they are absent from work. >>steve: one of the great things is if you're in shape studies have shown you actually do more, a better job at work. >> and you're going to ward off the flu probably easier too. >>gretchen: cheaper health care costs for employers. >> always worry about their bottom line. >>brian: talk about pom granite juice. >> the f.e.c. released a final constituted by did pom juice. a judge ruled it used deceptive advertising in that it can treat or prevent heart disease, prostate c
, might he have invested in condominiums which could have helped the economy more? >> he was considering taking a piece of the san diego padres but for tax reason decided not to. what do you think is a fair share? you make a million bucks a year. what is a fair share the government should take off you?is that fair? >>steve: is it fair that some people pay zero in federal taxes? >> okay. what kind of a government takes half of any man's income? what kind of a government does that? >>brian: tell us how you feel. tweet us. varney and company coming up at 9:20. i have a sense you're talking golf. >> amazing, isn't it? >>brian: this time you got the hair on your back standing up. >> i do. >>brian: 20 minutes after the hour. a new invention can track if mentally ill patients are taking their medication. is this ethical? dr. samadi is here live. >>steve: dangling on the edge. wait till you see how these [ male announcer ] coughequence™ #8. waking the baby. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient rel
. and then the president says he's not negotiating on the debt ceiling. what does that mean for our economy? senator rob portman says he's got an idea and alternative. that senator up next. here he comes. >>gretchen: welcome back. how big of a threat is our national debt? one theme from the hbo film "too big to fail" spells out the risks pretty clearly. watch it. >> the threats from russia, they suggest we coordinate and without warning dump hundreds of billions of if fannie's and freddie's bonds on to the market. the amount of debt your country carries is a terrible vulnerability. >>gretchen: a terrible vulnerability. senator rob portman couldn't agree more. he's a member of the senate finance committee and former budget director for george w. bush. good morning to you, senator. when we hear this vulnerability, you agree with that; right? >> absolutely. the president yesterday said we need to raise the debt limit because we have to pay our bills. we're at historic levels, $130,000 per family right now, over $16.5 trillion. yes, we need to raise the debt limit at some point but we have to do it in the c
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)